BlueJeans Articles | BlueJeans - Business Video Communications

BlueJeans Articles

Explore the evolution of video conferencing and video call collaboration through the eyes of industry experts. Whether it's a conference call, a webinar, or a livestream broadcast, the next wave of video conferencing has never been simpler to join and more versatile to use. From higher ROI to increased employee engagement to integrating legacy video systems, discover all the different ways that your business can benefit from the BlueJeans experience.

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By Susannah Magers BlueJeans Chief Product Officer, Mark Strassman discusses how he discovered BlueJeans first as a customer, the video-first ethos of BlueJeans, and the difference between adoption life cycles in business and consumer video conferencing solutions.
What’s coming soon in the world of online video calling? BlueJeans software developers are playing around with a few ideas.
You can’t have a video call without audio. More and more, customers are making really good audio a requirement, not a "nice-to-have". Audio quality has been a thorn in the side of the video conferencing world for decades, but BlueJeans immediately made better audio quality a primary objective. New audio codecs, or “audio stacks,” are always coming out: G.722 and Opus are just two of many. Dolby Laboratories’ audio conferencing codec, however, has been a game changer that provides incredible advancements, and BlueJeans knew right away that it was the one to integrate into its services.
Many companies out there are still struggling to wrap their heads around the advent of cloud video conferencing. Perhaps they have been using software as a service (SaaS) approaches for other aspects of their business, but have been mostly reliant on traditional on-premises hardware for their telephony systems. Or maybe they’ve spent money on room systems that incorporate Cisco or Polycom hardware, and are reluctant to tackle the beast of interoperability—that is, getting their SaaS cloud conferencing software (for instance via Skype for Business) to work with the room systems.
Work involves constant business meetings, there’s no denying it. Which inevitably leads to the pesky problem of how to optimize them. Possible meeting solutions: Should our group have a daily stand-up? Should we institute a company-wide ban on Friday meetings, so everyone has at least one day to do the work they committed to over the last four days of solid meetings?
Modern enterprise is made up of globally dispersed yet globally connected employees and teams—people who are all over the map literally and figuratively. For a long time, notes Robb Woods, BlueJeans Director of Business Value and Solution Strategy, folks in his business would drop out because they were tired of trying to convince potential customers that business video conferencing is something they need. But as we speak, he says, a robust, scalable, highly interactive mode of communication is becoming a must-have, not a nice-to-have. That’s what BlueJeans has done.
When it comes to video or audio conferencing services, BlueJeans and Dolby Voice are joining forces to surpass audio conferencing limitations. Spatial audio by Dolby brings you the best audio experience for your meetings—with technological sophistication you can trust. 
With the incomparable Dolby sound experience, you can trust that your video conference calls will never be the same. The audio quality of a traditional conference call can remind you of many environments that are not conducive to a productive meeting: the rush of air in an airplane cabin, a crowded coffee shop or a busy street. With Dolby audio integration, you can work on the go from your favorite coffee shop, in an airport lounge, or virtually anywhere without worrying that your audio quality will be compromised.
BlueJeans CPO Mark Strassman explains how BlueJeans product development and support networks have implemented a customer-first vision. We have all been there: during a conversation, the person on the other line cuts you off mid-sentence in exasperation: “You’re breaking up.” This experience, Strassman contends, is a certain (albeit learned) acceptance around the unpredictability of the cellular call. It’s just something we are conditioned to endure: it’s a built-up tolerance to mediocrity with the cell phone experience. But, when it comes to a video call? “People don’t have that same tolerance. If a call drops during a video call, there’s a problem with our product.”
When the hit game show "Who Wants to Be A Millionaire?" debuted in 1999, one of the most exciting (and happily unpredictable) parts of the contestant’s journey to fortune was the option of polling the audience if a question proved difficult. The show also utilized the conference call; contestants could also elect to “phone a friend,” or invoke their “lifeline” for the most challenging questions, which got tougher the further they made it.     

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